The Second Truth

Truth – 1. Conformity to knowledge, fact, or actuality; veracity.  2. Something that is the case; the real state of affairs.  3. Reality; actuality.  4. A statement proven to be or accepted as true.  5. Sincerity; honesty. – American Heritage Dictionary

By looking at the above definition of truth, one will think that truth is one-sided, as we have traditionally learned to believe.  “There is only one truth” is a phrase that we have heard many times, and possibly agreed with it.  I say, we should consider a second truth, not only when the first truth does not suffice, but always.  To illustrate this point, let me relate to you something I overheard this morning at the post office.  This post was inspired by that conversation.

A man was talking to the clerk about a problem with his red mustang (later I saw the man at the parking lot pulling out in the new model).  Apparently, something had been wrong with it and the mechanic took time figuring out what it was.  The man was making these comments, feeling certain that he knew the truth.

Mustang Man“These mechanics know nothing these days.  They cannot figure out the problem unless they hook the car to a machine.  I remember when good mechanics used to know what was wrong with the car just by listening to it – blah, blah, blah …”

Mustang Man continued to share his wisdom and the more truth he felt he shared the better he seemed to feel, and he left the post office smiling and wishing the clerk a great day.  The clerk seemed to agree with him as well.  I was smiling, and Mustang Man smiled and gestured a good-bye to me.  However, I was smiling, not because I agreed with his truth, but because I knew of a second truth.  There, I saw how truth is based on our own experiences and the knowledge we have at the moment of a particular subject.

My truth – My truth is based on different information and knowledge of the subject.  See, I am married to a mechanic, and by default, a lot of the knowledge has trickled down to me.  Many times, I find myself in conversation with my sister, and she tells me – “the mechanic just told me what you just thought it may be.”  I laugh because, in 25 years of marriage, I have become a sponge, learning little bits by osmosis.  Through my husband I have learned that today’s cars are not even a shadow of what cars where many years ago – possibly the time -frame Mustang Man was talking about.  Today’s cars are computerized beasts full of software and sensors that depend on one another, like a steampunk symphony, one thing affecting the other but not necessarily becoming a part of it.  Today’s mechanics are more knowledgeable in terms of absorbing and learning more information, and knowing different systems, than yesteryear mechanics.  They need to learn software, and learn to use it to be able to diagnose a car properly.  Today’s computerized beasts are more than motor and spark, therefore requiring precise computerized adjustments.  With so many sensors and software systems, one little issue may trigger another, and therefore making it more difficult to diagnose.  This would be impossible to do by a yesteryear mechanic  or a.k.a. Mustang Man’s hero.

Another issue with today’s systems is that they keep changing at fast pace, as technology changes, and the consumer seems to want more “bells and whistles” and comforts.  This creates the need for better trained mechanics who undergo continuing education through their jobs.  High end cars, have very sophisticated computerized systems, that only become available to lower end models later on, or by special order – depending on the maker.

According to Mustang Man’s truth, which was based on old-fashion knowledge of automotive systems and an admiration for the good ole’ mechanic, today’s mechanics know nothing.  According to my truth, which is based on more current information on automotive systems and my admiration for my mechanic hubby, today’s mechanics are more knowledgeable and educated.  Two truths that are completely opposite and both influenced by the observer/participant experience.

And that is why you should always consider the second truth – learn, explore, inform yourself, and then make up your mind, before uttering your only truth.

English: Own Work, Public Domain School in Col...

English: Own Work, Public Domain School in Columbus Avenue, New York, NY, USA. Category:Images of automobiles (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Writing Candy – Sifting the Husks

Let me start by saying that the path to a writing career requires a certain amount of study and learning, and tons of practice.  I say a certain amount because, writing should be your  primary focus.  Learning and reading other authors will teach you a great deal; however, it is by writing and rewriting that you will learn.  I wish I knew this when I started on this journey, it would have save me some precious time, but no ones knows it all.  With this in mind, from time to time, I try to share with you any blogs or sites that I think would have saved me much time, if I had known of them earlier.  This is in the hopes of saving you some time so you can embrace your writing.  Although everyone learns in different ways and pace, I can tell you that in my case I had to sift between much hay and debris to get to the grain.  For me the learning process was exhausting at times.  This is the reason I get so excited when I come across a blog or website that gives me the feeling of “Wow, I wish I had found you sooner.”  Here are a few that will certainly teach you or inform you in the right direction.

I don’t know how long these sites have been around but I recognize that these are professionals in their craft, and reading them early in your writing journey will help a great deal.  I hope that you enjoy these sites, as much as I do.

Keeping Up with the Techies

Micro-chip - integrated electronics

Image via Wikipedia

Technology changes so fast that it amazes me.  I am conflicted at times by this issue.  Although it is fun to try new gadgets, it is hard to keep up with all that is going on in the technology area, especially in the world of electronics.  I do my best to keep up, at least to be informed.  It seems that as soon as one masters a gadget, another one appears, faster and better, with more applications and elements of awe.

This is the world that we live in, fast and techie, like it or not.  As writers, we can take advantage of these applications and technological advances or we can just get behind, and have less exposure and opportunities.  Eventually, the world keeps moving, readers evolve, genres do as well – even if it does not seem so obvious.  Embracing technology is opening doors; attempting to get up to speed on it, might be suicide for many, but at least we try.

Young writers are born with the speed and skills of a new generation of super techies, they are the future of writing, in tune with today’s readers, and at par with readers of the future.  Writing will evolve, at least in the mediums in which it is presented, as well as in the way stories are created, and future words come to be.  New technology creates new words … new worlds.

Review of RICH & HAPPY by Robert Kiyosaki

The complete title is:  If you want to be RICH & HAPPY don’t go to school.  A work of love, this book presents Robert Kiyosaki’s view of the education system in which we grow up and get educated by.  An eye opener for most, and a sad truth, the book explains how the system prepares you for failure in the future.  It shows you how the harmful programming you received during your school years prevents and sabotages your success.  Robert says it like it is, and doesn’t sugar coat it.  He is also deeply concerned about the wrong programming that has been going on for many generations, and still continues.  While reading these truths, I got chills, and couldn’t help but feel sad for our children; tears streamed down while recognizing some of the patterns, in myself.  A must read for every parent, and teacher, but mostly, for every one of us, who has been educated in the system.